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What are resonant frequencies?

Discussion in 'Music Production' started by koozin, Dec 3, 2016.

  1. koozin

    koozin Forum Member

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    I see a lot of people talking about EQing to get rid of the resonant frequencies, but I would like to understand why this is a good practice or rule.

    I am able to identify those frequencies using the EQ Sweep, but is this really necessary? Does the sound lose its character or fundamentals?

    Tks! :Dance4:
     
  2. nab

    nab Forum Member

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    It depends on the sound. Sometimes the resonant frequency is part of the sound, like in a filter sweep. However sometimes your audio will end up with resonant lumps in strange places that don't really contribute to the sound. If so look at the sound with a frequency analyser and cut out the lump.
     
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  3. koozin

    koozin Forum Member

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    Tks for the reply!
     
  4. Speakafreaka

    Speakafreaka Champagne Rouletter

    It's possible to go completely overboard with zapping out frequencies that are actually fine.

    I'd advise caution with cutting out specific frequencies as pretty much a last resort - 99 times out of 100 you'll find me getting the source sound more to my liking these days.

    If you can hear a specific frequency literally like a sine wave sticking out of a sound then yeah, tight narrow peak EQ can help, but has a negative effect on the sound quickly and irreversibly.
     
  5. Kayal

    Kayal Forum Member

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    Sometimes resonant frequencies seem to 'stand' in the room, the can give you the feeling something is out of key, especially the lower you go in the freq. range, like with basslines; which are heard the most time of the song.
    If you loose fundamentals should be a matter of taste.
     
  6. nab

    nab Forum Member

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    Yes be careful that the resonant frequency isn't actually your room's acoustic response
     
  7. Yhoda

    Yhoda https://soundcloud.com/user-903269867

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    Yes defo my girls little room enhanced my low end resonance. I thought i had a bad mix but it was just due to the rooms verb. But good i sorted it out so it should sound good in a cave

    This is why most pros say play your music in many places ie bathroom, car, kitchens and on many systems. Each room and systems will behave differently due to shape size and or lack of soft furnishings. Each room will mask or enhance certain resonance. I think earphones or buds are good cos you dont get room verb but never finish till you tested in many places. We want our music sounding good in as many places as possible

    Dont forget mono too
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2016
  8. Swen

    Swen Forum Member

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    Actually have a question related to resonant frequencies in my bass. I haven't quite figured out yet if it's because of my room setup, but on almost every typical psy-trance bass I make there's an annoying "droning" frequency around the 130Hz mark on the spectrum.

    Is this a common place for resonant frequencies in a Saw tooth bass? Or is my room setup creating this interference? Professional tracks don't seem to have this issue when I play them through the same setup.
     
  9. Yhoda

    Yhoda https://soundcloud.com/user-903269867

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    Sounds like you have the perfect room. I have to go into my girls room to hear my drones... The solution for me is simply, zoom right into the audio wave form (have to convert to audio) look at the tail. You will prob notice its wiggly, I slice a tiny bit before the next bass hit (for short silence) then i show fades and drag it to the begining of the kick the wiggly bit will be almost gone plus you can curve the fade to make it totally flat. This should solve ur probs. Plus ur kick will punch throu better cos ur making more room for the kick by taking out the drone
     
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  10. Yhoda

    Yhoda https://soundcloud.com/user-903269867

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    This is why i love working it audio you can see the problems. And remember mozat said music is the silence inbetween! Thats a good thing to keep in mind even if its milliseconds

    Hope that helps, happy producing dude.

    Ps thanks for the comment on my song i like the same bit too. I pull funny faces hahaha
     
  11. Yhoda

    Yhoda https://soundcloud.com/user-903269867

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    Ye
    Yes its a must to get clean sounds. Your basically cutting holes so other sounds can shine throu as well (kill 2 birds with 1 stone) Sound needs space in the frequency as well as in the stereo field. Mixxing and mastering is an art in itself. And you will want to group and eq that as a whole. You will have offensive sounds where 2 synths are playing the frequency at
    the same time... I had 2 synths leads boosted at the same freq but when i played them together i had to decide which to be more dominant so i cut where the other is dominant. Slighty off topic (a titch) but its the same principle to get a clean mix
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2016
  12. Andy McBain

    Andy McBain Lurker

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    Hi Swen,

    From my experience this isn't a frequency area that usually needs much "taming" for a psy bass line. A few things to try, if you haven't already -

    - Loop notes of the same pitch and run them through a spectrum analyser (I use the analyser in Fabfilter Pro-Q) to see if the area around the 2nd (or even 3rd depending on your fundamental pitch...) harmonic is poking out more than the others.

    - Try a different synth - it may have something to do with the saw wave (every synth has a slightly different wave), or some kind of unexplained resonance created by the filter, or some other processing.

    - And as Yhoda mentioned, it may be down to the programming of the note itself... adjust note lengths, filter envelope sustain levels... etc :Smile3:

    Or post an example so we can hear! :Smile3:
     
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  13. Faction

    Faction Proto-col

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    If many of your bass sounds seem to have a 'drone' at around 130Hz, this is most likely to be because that's one of the resonant frequencies of your studio room. If that's the case, when you EQ your bass to remove the resonance you're more than likely to be making your bass sound crap on other sound systems.

    Most sounds cover fairly wide ranges of the frequency spectrum and will overlap. Shaping sounds so that their most important frequency ranges are clearly audible amongst each other is very sensible, but trying to get rid of all the overlaps is a fool's errand and will destroy your mix.
     
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  14. antic

    antic Junior Members

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    I wonder, does the above come from your own experience? Because there was a time few years back when your mastering was pretty characteristic with very thick, warm, punchy and prominent basslines (Voice of Cod / OOOD albums, Cronomi & DAT Rec. releases, Globular). This seems to be less noticeable nowadays and I always thought that maybe it's because of your room introducing that "special sound"? :Smile3:
     
  15. Faction

    Faction Proto-col

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    Well for a start the only OOOD albums I've mastered were Breathing Space in 1999 and You Think You Are in 2012, and Chris mastered Gone Fission, but thanks :Smile3: I did move studio rooms in 2011 when I moved house but the room I had between 2001 and 2011 did sound naturally very good indeed, in fact that bedroom sounded better in some ways than my current dedicated treated studio, which is smaller than I would like and even with corner bass traps for days it doesn't behave the same in the low end. I also got new monitors around 2015 - ported rather than infinite baffle, which makes a big (and not brilliant) difference down low - and my mastering chain has developed, although I have kept many of the elements that I thought gave my mastering the characteristics it has. So a lot has changed over the last few years, and whilst my personal tastes have also changed over time (away from the slammed dynamics that often result from over-hyped bass and sub), so have fashions in psytrance production - and much of the sound of the final master comes from the original production and engineering.

    I'll always take my clients' preferences into account however, and if someone says "I love what you did on People Walk Funny" I'll use a couple of tracks off the album as a reference.
     
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  16. antic

    antic Junior Members

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    @Colin, thanks! BTW, have you mastered recently any obscure release you'd think is worth checking out? :Smile3:
     
  17. nab

    nab Forum Member

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    Is there any particular size or shape of room that is best for achieving stable frequency response?
     
  18. nab

    nab Forum Member

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    It's something I've never looked into before. I've just accepted whatever room I come across in life. But it would be handy to know what to look out for next time I move.

    My current room is ok if you sit in a particular spot but it's bassy as hell if you move back a couple of feet.
     
  19. Faction

    Faction Proto-col

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    I'm far from expert in acoustic treatment but having non-parallel walls is quite prized as it eliminates flutter echo. What you describe about your current room is how all rectangular rooms are likely to behave, as far as I know. If I'm using a pre-existing room in a house for a studio, I'd be very happy with a room at least 4m wide and 5m long, with a window in the middle of one short wall and the door directly behind it. Load-bearing walls all round, ideally. I'd set up with the speakers either side of the window.
     
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  20. nab

    nab Forum Member

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    i seem to remember that wooden suspended floors are considered quite good as they let the bass bleed into them, whereas a concrete floor thros the sound straight back into the room?
     

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